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by Rob O'Boyle

On May 1, 1961 the Board of Supervisors of Onondaga County unanimously approved the creation of a two-year technical college in Onondaga County. Democratic Supervisors called for an amendment to add a liberal arts and sciences program to the technical programs but the amendment was defeated. Republican sponsors John Mulroy, Marcellus and Ephraim Shapero, 17th Ward did not see the need for a liberal arts and sciences program at that time. In introducing the resolution Mulroy called the plan “a historic step into the field of educating by the county”. 1

<em>Edit Blog entry</em> The OCC Seal

by Barbara Scheibel

Flames, quills, longhouses and laurel are some of the images that have made up the official OCC seals over the history of the college. The college seal is an official graphic representing the college and is used on official college documents, such as diplomas. OCC has had 3 different seals over the years, each reflecting the ideals, authority and purpose of the college.

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by Rob O'Boyle

<em>Edit Blog entry</em> The Poorhouse

by Rob O'Boyle

For more than a century, the Onondaga County “Poorhouse” served as a haven for the community’s most vulnerable citizens. Throughout the 19th and early 20th centuries the Poorhouse provided a refuge for thousands of patients, residents and those who cared for them.

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by Barbara Scheibel

Admiral Elmo Zumwalt Jr., former chief of the United States naval operations, visited and spoke at Onondaga Community College on November 3, 1988 to help to celebrate Veterans Recognition Month. Zumwalt was the youngest person to serve as Chief of Naval Operations. Zumwalt was a decorated war veteran whose efforts helped to improve the lives of enlisted soldiers and ease racism and sexism in the Navy. Zumwalt spoke to the OCC community of “lessons learned” during his experiences in World War II and the Korean and Vietnam wars at a lecture in Storer Auditorium.

<em>Edit Blog entry</em> 700 Years Ago on Onondaga Hill

by Rob O'Boyle

During the summer of 1966 students from Syracuse University, Westhill, West Genesee and Marcellus High Schools participated in an excavation of a Native American settlement under the direction off Professor James Tuck of the Archeology Department at Syracuse University.

<em>Edit Blog entry</em> Job Application Leads to Creation of Alma Mater

By: Carrie Coviello

 

<em>Edit Blog entry</em> Ground Broken 50 Years Ago on Construction of OCC Campus

 

By: Carrie Coviello

 

On October 25, 1968, a ground-breaking ceremony was held on to mark the beginning of construction of the OCC campus on Onondaga Hill. Did you know that the land that OCC now stands on was not originally where the College was located? Or that there was controversy on the location of where to build the campus?

 

<em>Edit Blog entry</em> Pogey Pond

 

by Rob O'Boyle

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By Deborah Bauder

OCC has a bit of a secret. Tucked in the trees on the edge of campus is a piece of local history that most people don’t even know is there. The General Ellis Cemetery, with a first recorded burial in 1798, has been largely forgotten by all but the most dedicated of local history buffs. And yet it houses a rather interesting piece of American history in its woody grove – the final resting place of one of Syracuse’s earliest pioneers.

 

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